The latest issue of the Association of Women Educators’ journal, Redress, is a special issue on Refugee Education.

“The edition includes insights from educators and those working with refugees as well as personal and compelling stories from refugees themselves. The impact of relocation under difficult circumstances can only be truly understood by those who have experienced it and we are grateful for the people who have been honest and open in sharing their story. The importance of education and the role it can play to bring hope and a better future to young people is a recurring theme. The role of teachers and especially their ongoing support can’t be underestimated. The contribution they make to individuals is confirmed through these personal reflections.”

Click here to visit: http://www.publications.awe.asn.au/redress-december-2019

You may also be interested in the Refugee Education Special Interest Group – For further information or to join the group (free-no fee involved) please visit: http://refugee-education.org/

The articles in Redress include-

  • COLLECTIVE ACTION FOR ADVOCATING FOR BETTER EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES AND OUTCOMES FOR STUDENTS FROM FORCED MIGRATION BACKGROUNDS: EPISTEMIC COMMUNITIES AND AN IMPERATIVE TO CARE by Sally Baker, Chair, Refugee Education Special Interest Group; University of New South Wales and members of the Refugee Education Special Interest Group: Sally Morgan, Monash University; Meera Varadharajan, University of New South Wales; Lesley Cioccarelli, Canberra Institute of Technology; Elena Killiakova, Independent Researcher; Karen Dunwoodie, Deakin University
  • YOUNG PEOPLE SEEKING ASYLUM: EDUCATIONAL COMMUNITIES AND ACCESS by Sally Morgan
  • TRAPPED IN PROTECTED REFUGEE CAMPS: ‘PLEASE HELP ME TO SURVIVE’ by Suban Kumar Chowdhury, Anne Keary and Eisuke Saito
  • I WISH THEY WERE LIKE YOU: REFLECTIONS OF A STUDENT FROM A REFUGEE BACKGROUND by Ali Hazara and Karen Dunwoodie
  • GIVING BACK, PAYING FORWARD: LESSONS LEARNED FROM RESEARCHING WITH CHILDREN AND YOUTH FROM REFUGEE BACKGROUNDS by Jane Wilkinson, Faculty of Education, Monash University and Mervi Kaukko, Faculty of Education and Culture, Tampere University
  • ‘EVERYTHING’S ABOUT ENGLISH…’ ENGLISH AS AN ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE AS A DIAGNOSIS OF DEFICIT FOR STUDENTS FROM REFUGEE BACKGROUNDS by Melanie Baak and Emily Miller
  • A COHESIVE SOCIETY: OUR FUTURE DEPENDS ON IT by Adele Rice AM and colleagues
  • A DREAM LIFE IN MY SECOND HOME by Samira Mohammadzadegan

Plus a lot more. Click here to have a look!

ATESOL ACT warmly invites you to their next fabulous Professional Learning event, Share Your Best Lesson on Saturday, 15th August 2020 from 3.00pm to 5.00pm on Zoom.  Click here for further information.

 

Bookings and Prepayment ESSENTIAL by COB Tuesday 8th August 2020
To book for this event, please visit: atesolact.org.au/events

Read the July VicTESOL eBulletin online now.
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Tuesday 21st July 11.00am-12.45pm

MYAN is excited to invite you to their National Youth Panel led by young people from refugee and migrant backgrounds exploring the new normal during and beyond COVID-19.

Click here for further information or to RSVP.

Download (PDF, Unknown)

This session was a practical workshop to assist teachers to modify programs and scaffold learning to assist EAL students to access the Victorian Curriculum across all subject areas. Participants learnt about engaging EAL learners, scaffolding essential vocabulary and making appropriate modifications to learning and assessment tasks.

The session began with a short presentation from Ruth Hibburt. The presentation focused on the ‘nuts and bolts’ of differentiation. The powerpoint presentation is available above. A recording of the presentation will be available shortly.

This presentation was followed by expert teachers from GELC working with participants in small groups to guide them through making appropriate adjustments to a work sample for their EAL learners. Participants were asked to send in a work sample such as lesson plan, unit planner, assessment task or worksheet they are currently using or are planning to use in Term 3 so that GELC staff could formulate recommendations tailored specifically to participants’ needs. This part of the session was not recorded.

This session was aimed at primary and secondary school teachers. Prior to this event, participants were asked to read pages 32-36 of the article ‘Catering for EAL/D Students’ Language Needs in Mainstream Classes: Early Childhood Teachers’ Perspectives and Practices in One Australian Setting’ (Toni Dobinson & Sylvia Buchori).

* Recommended reading: Dobinson, T. J., & Buchori, S. (2016). Catering for EAL/D Students’ Language Needs in Mainstream Classes: Early Childhood Teachers’ Perspectives and Practices in One Australian Setting.. Australian Journal of Teacher Education, 41(2).

Ruth Hibburt is a highly accomplished teacher with over 12 years experience teaching in Victorian Secondary Schools 7-12 and English Language Centres P-10. She specialises in teaching the academic language of Mathematics and Science through planning, engagement, curriculum development, assessment and reporting for EAL Maths and Science P-10. Ruth is a positive change maker in education and an expert in building skills and confidence with teachers and students. She has taught over 3000 students from a diverse range of social backgrounds and learning needs. Ruth currently works in Victorian schools as a Network Numeracy Improvement Teacher.

The GELC staff are all qualified specialist EAL teachers with many years experience in delivering English language programs. GELC programs develop the English language knowledge and skills for students to access the Victorian curriculum across a range of subjects areas including maths, science, humanities and ICT. GELC staff also work in a coaching and mentoring capacity with mainstream classroom teachers to scaffold learning appropriately to meet the needs of EAL students.

Here is a presentation by Premila Veerasamy and Hsah Mu Hen Tun (Geelong English Language School) that covers some further content relating to the discussions from this professional learning event:

Download (PPTX, 4.88MB)

Read the June VicTESOL eBulletin online now.
Click here to read online.

And if you would like to subscribe to receive future updates please click here.

A PRESENTATION OF ONLINE EDUCATION RESOURCES FOR ALL STUDENTS OF ALL
AGES & BACKGROUNDS

Wed 10th June, 4.30pm AEST

TasTESOL has organised a free presentation by the National Portrait Gallery in Canberra showcasing their fabulous online educational resources.  Using Zoom, they will look at 4-5 pictures related to the theme of multiculturalism and identity and discuss how they could be used in class (for all ages).

The presentation comes highly recommended by our colleagues in ATESOL, ACT:
“The brilliant thing about the NPG is that the program can be designed in collaboration with their staff. There could be a focus on different themes, e.g. Indigenous Australians and their stories, women, Tasmanians, people in/from remote places, musicians, Australian history, democracy and more!”

PLEASE RSVP  TO contact.tastesol [at] gmail.com AND THE LINK WILL BE FORWARDED TO YOU LATER.

Put the date on your calendar now!

Read the May VicTESOL eBulletin online now.
Click here to read online.

And if you would like to subscribe to receive future updates please click here.

Skye Playsted Thursday 14 May 2020 When we think of the term ‘culture’, it can be easy to focus on concrete elements such as art, music, clothing or food. However, these visible aspects are only the tip of the cultural iceberg (Ting-Toomey & Chung, 2011). Deeper cultural assumptions are hidden from view and are not…

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ELTons would like to invite you and your networks to nominate those from across the English language teaching community around the world who inspire you and others. You can find out more and make a submission on the ELTons website by Friday 29 May, 23.59 (UK time).

Now more than ever, it’s important to recognise and celebrate people who have made a lasting and extraordinary impact on teaching and learning. Who do you think should win the ELTons award for outstanding achievement in English language teaching?

Nominations for the British Council ELTons Outstanding Achievement Award are encouraged from all nationalities, cultural or ethnic backgrounds, genders and first languages, and can include well-known leaders to typically unsung heroes.

We would like to hear who for you has:

  • Made a significant contribution to further English language teaching.
  • Helped shape the English language teaching profession or industry.
  • Had an impact on a wide audience.

Click here to visit https://www.teachingenglish.org.uk/article/eltons-outstanding-achievement-award-2020 for further information.